Last summer, Hannah Bailey, the founder of Tie Dye High Five, held a number of workshops for the employees of WeWork, the co-working space provider, during a company retreat. Attendees, who came from all over the world, were told in advance to bring old white items. They were shown simple tie-dye techniques — a swirl, a crumple, a stripe — that are easy enough to pick up for the uninitiated. “People were really proud of what they’d produced,” says Bailey. “If they’d just bought something in a shop, they wouldn’t have had the same association with it.” They were also encouraged to go home and get creative with other clothes, curtains or fabrics. Adds Bailey: “Tie-dye isn’t a trend, it’s a mentality.” Bailey founded Tie Dye High Five in 2013 to offer classes for Londoners. She’s since expanded globally, travelling as far as Cambodia to conduct some of the more than 2,000 workshops she has now undertaken with her team of volunteers. “The aim is to get people tapping into their creativity,” she says. “We have a DIY mentality. We want to help make people feel brighter, and to make the world a brighter place. We also want to encourage people to upcycle and re-use their clothes and kee...